May 12, 2017 |

Tricot – 3

Tricot – 3

May 12, 2017 |

 

J-Math Rock. This is the only way to describe the all-girl band Tricot as they return with album #3 which is titled… 3. With 7 years experience together and numerous (and successful) tours, even supporting The Pixies at the iconic landmark (located in my home county of Cornwall) Eden Project.

Tricot bring a crazed blend of music to toy with your head as you try and captivate a flowing beat as wildly discorded guitar plays over a frantic drum beat in the opening track Tokyo Vampire Hotel with a clean vocals throughout the track. Following onto Wabi-Sabi is like listening to the less-evil twin of the opening track, with clearer sounding instruments but with the incredible technicality that brings the unique sound. Yosoiki becomes further more chilled, with a funky bass line, which then makes you believe these talented J-Rockers must have great Jazz music experience. DeDeDe has a really beautifully sung chorus, unfortunate to my lack of my language barrier, I’m not sure what the words mean in English, but the style of vocal range used works well. Sukima brings things back to basics after your head has been bouncing off the walls from the Jazz infused rock tracks that kicked off the album, with a very laid back, easy listening jam.

Pork Side is a one minute interlude which leads into Pork Ginger which doesn’t sound very appetising, but has a nice punchy bass and a very precise and clear guitar lead as the mysterious atmospheric vocals form behind the main voice. An all out gritty rock feel from Echo which shows a different tone from the rest of the album so far, until unleashing 18, 19 bringing back that energy fuelled sound, imagine Mars Volta / Fall Of Troy with a little more structure and a female singer (of course sung in Japanese) it is one in a million to stumble across such a frantic indie-rock sound as this. Namu is another interlude with a vocal line throughout the track sounding like an Anime show just looping “Nam nam nam”. Munasawagi opens with all instruments with a choppy guitar in the background and a jazz lead with on beat drums, before switching things up with the experimental time signatures as by now you have gotten used to hearing. Setsuyakuka starts off much more upbeat and pacey drum rolls while guitar chords play, catchy melodies sweep through the chorus and a very interesting slowed down bridge before stepping up the pace again and incredible high notes ringing out from vocalist. The final song Melon Soda starts off with a catchy bass line, soon joined by an equally catchy lead guitar reflecting off each other before falling into a delicate voice and simple drum beat. At the 2 minute mark still keeping things simple but bringing the heavier elements back and drums switching in and out of time with the initial song to throw you off as the album comes to a close.

Tricot are certainly a mix of ingredients that make for a unique product and something you can’t imagine until you hear it first hand. They will make their way back to the UK this August, and recommend sparing an ear for such a unique sounding band.

Check out the track ‘DeDeDe’ below: