September 21, 2017 |

The Movielife Talk New Album and UK Tour

The Movielife Talk New Album and UK Tour

September 21, 2017 |

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We caught up with Brandon Reilly from The Movielife to talk about the new album, Cities In Search of a Heart, an upcoming U.K. tour and their legacy as melodic hardcore legends.

 

You’re about to drop Cities In Search of a Heart, your first album in fourteen years, how are you feeling on the cusp of its release?

Mind numbingly ecstatic! On top of the world, Ma!

Although you’ve been back playing shows for a couple of years, does signing to Rise Records and recording new material feel like a fresh start for The Movielife?

It absolutely is a fresh start. Can’t wait for everyone to hear the new album, and we hope to see many of you on our UK headline tour in November.

How do you think the intervening years have evolved the band’s sound?

Vinnie and I have grown exponentially as songwriters. He did incredible things with I Am The Avalanche, and his debut solo album is my favourite thing he's ever done, save for the new Movielife album. I did a bunch of releases with Nightmare of You, which I fronted, during those years, and just released a solo EP as well. There was a lot of time for reflection and growth between 2003 and now, and I believe that shows on Cities In Search of a Heart.

Mercy Is Asleep At The Wheel was the first track you revealed from the new record. What can you tell us about that track and why was it chosen as the first taste?

I felt very influenced by Seaweed on that one. Lyrically, it’s a comment on American culture at this present moment. I think it was the best first song to premiere because it's very well rounded, and captures the signature of past Movielife, but also gives a new taste of where we are at now. It feels like an appropriate continuation from where we left off on Forty Hour Train Back To Penn.

More recently you released Ghosts In The Photographs, what’s the story of that track?

It's one of my favourite songs on the record. It gives a glimpse into what the music has evolved into, after being away fourteen years. Melodically, Vin and I have taken a different approach with this song than what we would have done a long time ago. It’s more thoughtful and crafted, despite the simplicity of the chord changes.

 

It’s fair to say your last full length Forty Hour Train Back To Penn is considered a seminal record, does that affect the task of writing new material?

Yes. Everyone will compare our new record with Forty Hour. That’s natural. And sure, we felt some pressure there - but that subsided once we got into our writing groove and mutually agreed that this record surpasses Forty Hour in virtually every aspect. With that said, I understand how nostalgia works, and perhaps it’ll be hard for some people to accept that there’s a new record. I've been there with my favourite bands - and it's ok!