May 29, 2017 |

A chat with Set It Off at Slam Dunk Midlands 2017!

A chat with Set It Off at Slam Dunk Midlands 2017!

May 29, 2017 |

ADVERTISMENT

ADVERTISMENT

Arriving for our first interview of Slam Dunk 2017 and we are met with a bubbly and excited Cody Carson, frontman for Florida "pop-punk/rock" band Set It Off. Check out our in-depth chat where we talk about Slam Dunk, the horrific Manchester attacks and the feeling playing in the city in the aftermath, the Upside Down writing process and a spooky supernatural encounter (this is why you should never play the witching hour kids!)

You’re back at Slam Dunk, you were last here in 2015. Are you pleased to have returned?

Oh my God yes. Slam Dunk 2015 was one of the most fun times I’ve ever had at a festival so needless to say I’m really, really excited to be back right now.

Are there any acts that you’re looking forward to seeing? I know you want to but can't see Don Broco

I want to see Don Broco so badly (sadly they clash). What stinks is usually I like to mentally prepare before I go on, so I’ll take like a full hour before I go on stage to warm up, get myself and everything ready for the show, which sucks because it takes me out of seeing people like Reel Big Fish and Less Than Jake, which are two other bands that I really wanna see. But I know that our friends in Tonight Alive are playing right after us so I should be able to see them, hopefully some Enter Shikari. Our guitarist Dan (Clermont) got me into them so I’m really excited for that.

I’m excited to see them too.

Yeah I’m really excited to see them, I know they put on a hell of a show so it’ll be a lot of fun!

You’re on a short co-headline tour with With Confidence. How has that been so far?

Yes. Oh my God it’s so good! We actually just played Glasgow but the night before that we played in Manchester which was just two days after the attacks (terror attacks at Ariana Grande’s show at the MEN) happened so going into it we were a little nervous. Not just because of the attacks but of other people’s safety, do they feel comfortable coming to the show? And I was just blown away in general by the whole city. There was a line outside, kids that were there since like 9 in the morning and we didn’t play til like 9 o’clock at night, actually that night, we didn’t play til 10, so they were there for almost 12 hours, just lined up, front row, people were screaming the words. You know it’s in the back of everyone’s head, what’s going on there but they were fearless and really getting into it and I feel like it was a show that was necessary, not just for them but for us. We wrote a song called Life Afraid about the attacks that happened in Paris and that was our chance to back it up, to actually be like “look listen, we’re not just words, this isn’t just a false empty shell of a song like we truly believe this” and we got to go out there and hopefully make them feel more comfortable and safer at shows. I think it was a milestone in our career and that show meant a lot to us. Not only has this tour been received very well but it holds a really meaningful show in the midst of it, in light of what’s happened.

Did you think about postponing the show after the attacks happened?

The night before we were leaving to go to Manchester, we saw reports saying that they raised the threat level to critical and that they were deploying military in the streets. We thought about a lot of things and my first thought was that it’s rare that lightning strikes twice in the same place in these sort of instances but also we’ve got to make sure everyone’s safe. We were going to leave it up to the venue, if the venue said the show goes on, the show goes on, if the venue says we’re cancelling due to threats or fear then we obviously can’t do anything about it but as long as it was in our control we were going to play that show whether it was to nobody, we wanted to be there to send a message to the world just to be like “listen, we’re not letting this affect what we love to do or change our way of life or the way we live in general.”

Yeah that’s fair, there was mixed reactions online, even about today of people unsure whether to come or not, which is totally understandable. It’s finding that balance of whether you feel you’ll be safe or not.

Yeah, you have to look out for your safety and I understand that but each to their own in this situation, that’s really all you can say, you can’t persuade someone a different way. If they don’t feel safe, they don’t feel safe. If they do feel safe then power to you.