July 31, 2017 |

We Chat to A Promise To Forget

We Chat to A Promise To Forget

July 31, 2017 |

ADVERTISMENT

ADVERTISMENT

Ahead of releasing their debut album Dying To Live on the 11th of August we had a chat with drummer John Fleetwood and vocalist Tim Castle from A Promise To Forget about recording the album, playing it live and dream collaborations.

Your debut album Dying to Live hits shelves on August 11th. How are you guys feeling on the cusp of its release?

We’re absolutely ecstatic! We’ve been sitting on this album for years and we can’t wait for these songs to finally reach the light of day. We’ve been playing some of the tracks live for a year or two so it’ll be great for fans to be able to hear them produced the way we intended. We’re anxious to show these songs to new audiences but that’s all part of the fun.

How do you think the sound of the band has evolved on this album from your previous releases?

On our last release, we were pretty firmly a post-hardcore band that also loved pop-punk/easycore so we had that Four Year Strong mixed with While She Sleeps weird combo going on and some of the time our set felt a bit bipolar.  We realised that we weren’t really combining our influences and sounds coherently. We spent lot of time admiring different methods of song writing and thematics. We decided we wanted the album to have leitmotifs and repeated ideas, to make the whole thing more connected, as well as organically incorporating our contrasting sounds. Songs like Power showcase our heavier side, and songs like Veins follow our more anthem and ballad-side. This album is us from front to back.

People may already be familiar with the album’s lead single Sylvia. What can you tell us about that song and why it was chosen as the first single?

Sylvia used to be nothing like what it became. I cleared out my granddads house and found photos of my grandmother called Sylvia. I had no idea that she was so artistic, and people tell me all the time that I get my artistic abilities from her, that I look like her and act like her. It was originally a slow ballad about our relationship, and the fact that I’d gained so much from her even though we’d never met. Ideas were bounced back and forth and it became a larger sound, bought it up to a modern tempo and worked super hard on it. Me and Tim worked on the lyrics relentlessly until it became what we hear it as today. It is my tribute to her and I’m very proud of it. When it came to recording the album, it stood out immediately as the strongest track, and I think that it is no coincidence.

I understand you had to overcome several hardships whilst putting this album together. Is that something that has made you stronger and more equipped as a band?

Being a mix of personalities and organisational skills, we are always encountering some form of trouble or challenge. Even when the band was young, we always made sure that cancelling or giving up was not an option. We’ve only had to cancel shows once or twice and they were always reprimanded or made up for. When we were hit with the news that 60-70% of the album was permanently lost in the mixing process, we were all distraught. Luckily, as the drummer, 90% of my parts were intact, but I spent a lot of time with guitars on this album too. We knew that we couldn’t give up, and we pulled ourselves up again and re-did almost the whole album again. I’d like to think that this version of the album was the better version, as every tiny part was looked over. From first stepping into the studio to receiving the final master tracks was around 11 months in total. We wear this as a badge of effort.